Spanish mackerel are back

There was a period after the unprecedented June run of Spanish mackerel when those tropical fish seemed to almost disappear from the Jersey surf, but they seem to be back again in several areas.

That was certainly the case this morning for famed outdoor writer Nick Honachefsky who kept getting into them at Normandy Beach from 7 to 11:30 a.m.  — when he left them biting.  There was tropical blue-green water on the beach with a southeast wind.

I had noted that even when I was catching them from the Bay Head surf a few weeks ago it was all blind castings unless some birds were picking as I never saw them do their typical arc out of the water. Nick said there was plenty of that today, and they responded to a Williamson Gomoku jig.  Though the Spanish mackerel we see up here are generally only about 14 to 16 inches, they are very good eating when prepared whole as there’s not much to fillet until they get to about 18 inches.

 

At Seaside Park, both Grumpy’s and Betty & Nick’s report loads of kingfish in the surf along with cocktail blues and improved fluking. Crabbing has finally turned on in the bay, and there are also blowfish at the docks. Tony Arcabascio also reported a big catch of his favorite eating fish after chumming for blowfish in Barnegat Bay.

The bluefish shot on a popper was sent by Nick from the spring run and just popped up as if in response to his name.

gaffed tuna.jpg

 

 

 

 

13-pound doormat eludes capture in Grandpa Savino Memorial

Despite the intense heat Saturday, fluking was good for anglers entered in the Grandpa Savino Memorial Fluke Tournament. Walter Fisher of the sponsoring Staten Island Tuna Club said he and his wife stuck it out all day and caught about 40 fluke including keepers up to 5 1/2 pounds — which turned out to be a little too big for the Joey’s Custom Fluke Rod awarded to a 5-pounder.

There was a doormat that won a lot o money, but that 11.45-pounder on Wandering Lady was still short of the 13-pound standard which would have payed off $25,000. Frank Noto’s crew won the three-fluke total prize with fish of 6.95 and 5.55 pounds added to the doormat for 23.95 pounds. Arthur Waldheim was the angler on all of those fluke.  Just a Fluke with Robert and Tommy Glynn was second with three fluke for 18.85 pounds, just ahead of Flatties & Fatties with 18.70 pounds. Frank Romano hit the 5-pound mark on the button to win the Joey’s custom rod while fishing on Joe Mattiolli’s Reel Life II.

Bob Matthews reports from Fisherman’s Den in Belmar Marina that some 5-pound fluke have been caught in Shark River, while bigger fluke are coming from the ocean — including one over 11 pounds on the Big Mohawk. Kingfish and small stripers are in the surf, and snappers are at the docks.  Exciting news from Fisherman’s Den North in Atlantic Highlands was the weighing of a 67-pound cobia. All I could find out this afternoon was that it was caught offshore.

Kingfish are so abundant in the surf that even I was able to catch a couple as Jerry Lasko and Maren Toleno were fishing for sharks at Bay Head yesterday evening. Those baits produced a small sand tiger release for Maren, and this morning she used a piece of kingfish to catch an exceptionally large cownose ray the Jerry estimated at 65 to 70 pounds after a long fight on the shark rod.

There was a large quantity of bait in Bay Head this morning, but there were no predators on them — and nothing was being caught. Just what the bait was is still mystery. Bob Correll reports it was back in the evening, though he only saw one Spanish mackerel caught.

Jim Hutchinson Sr. reports for the Beach Haven Charter Fishing Association that the  “Starfish” under the captainship of Carl Sheppard has been finding some very good action on the inshore reefs and structure. On Monday the Howell family had an action filled day of bottom fishing. A calm day produced non-stop action on black sea bass. The crew caught over 40 fish with 6 large keeper sea bass and a ling for dinner. On Tuesday Captain Carl and mate Marlyn fished with a family of 8 from New York. The group caught over 50 fish and kept 19 bluefish, 1 Spanish mackerel, and 4 black sea bass. A goodly number of short flounder were caught and released.

 

Memories connected with the moon landing

Where were you when notable events occurred? In my case it always seems as if I was fishing on those days. Yet, in the case of the moon landing I saw that on TV from a hotel room in Los Angeles after just returning from a trip to fish Ray Cannon’s Sea of Cortez Tournament in Baja California, Mexico.

I had recently become director of field testing for Garcia (Mitchell and Ambassadeur reels), and that was my first foreign fishing trip. There were two days of fishing at La Paz, Rancho Buena Vista and Cabo San Lucas. The famed fishing author Al McClane was a judge of the contest, and good fortune smiled on me as I won the roosterfish division  and was second in blue marlin — with both fish caught on an experimental telescopic spinning rod made by Ed Haenelt. Luckily, in those days there were few excess baggage charges on the airlines or I would have taken a beating getting the two heavy trophies home. All that excitement and the moon too!

There was no such good fortune this morning as Tommy Cox and I cast in Shark River. The incoming tide had just started when we arrived, and except for Saturday boat traffic everything looked good. However, Tommy only had three small fish on-and-off his popper and I had the same experience once plus a splash. There was no sign of the big blues that had been there yesterday morning.

Capt. Jim Freda of Shore Catch Charters out of Manasquan Inlet had better news from his son Tommy who mates for him and is now also mating some days on Capt. Alan Lee’s Mushin. That boat put a party into over 25 bluefins on jigs today.

Reader David Walsh reports he went out to Axel Carlsen Reef from 8:30 to 10 and ended up with four keeper fluke out of 20 — calling it a slow grind.

Bob Correll didn’t see anything caught early in the Bay Head surf, but was encouraged to see a Spanish mackerel arc out of the water. In the middle of the morning there was a sudden flurry and anglers on the spot caught a good-sized Spanish and released a 6-pound blue. Carl Dano and his wife tried for fluke there later and only caught kingfish that ate the gulp on fluke hooks. Jerry Lasko has been fishing for the kings in that area with Fishbites. Most are only about 10 inches, but a few slightly larger are mixed in. Use small hooks and pieces of worms, clam, squid or shrimp. They’re too small for filleting, but are tasty when prepared as a whole fish. There are no regulations on kingfish.

Seaside Park and IBSP anglers are also taking advantage of the kingfish run — and it’s probably just as good to the north.

Rich Johnson of The Fishing Line said porgies are thick in many areas off western Long Island. He thinks that’s due to the almost complete lack of bluefish and stripers there.

Capt. Vinny Vetere manages to find stripers with his Katfish out of Great Kills, and notes that it was only 75 degrees on the water a couple of days ago. He may be open tomorrow.

Capt. Dave De Gennaro is planning open boat trips tomorrow for mid-range tuna and for bonito at Barnegat Ridge on Monday. The tuna trip sails at 2:a.m., while the Ridge run starts at 6 a.m. You can call 732 330-5674 up to the last minute to check on openings.

The Jamaica from Brielle had a fine bonito trip Friday, with the hi-hook catching over 20. Some blues, chub mackerel and Spanish mackerel were also jigged. Aaron Ho from Philadelphia took the pool with a 5-pound bonito in his catch of 12 plus several mackerel.  The Jamaica sails daily for bonito, and has a 3/4-night ling trip tonight at 7:30.

bonito on Jamaica

Dave Merrill sent the following press release:

Canyon Club Resort Marina Hosts
Yacht Club of Stone Harbor 53rd Annual Marlin Tournament
The timing couldn’t be any better! As white marlin and blue marlin take up residence at the canyons off the mid-Atlantic coast, the Yacht Club of Stone Harbor is in the final stages of planning the Yacht Club of Stone Harbor Marlin Tournament. Hosted by Canyon Club Resort Marina in Cape May, New Jersey, this year marks the 53rd installment of this event making it one of the longest running billfish tournaments on the east coast. The Yacht Club of Stone Harbor has a rich history dating back to 1911 and this event is always popular with members, guests and tournament anglers alike each year. Various awards will be up for grabs including 1st, 2nd and 3rd Place Boat, 1st, 2nd and 3rd Place Angler, Top Female Angler, Top Junior Angler (16 and under) as well as 1st and 2nd Heaviest Tuna and 1st and 2nd Heaviest Dolphin. 1st and 2nd Place Team Award will also be presented and teams will consist of up to four boats each that will be picked lottery-style at the Captain’s Meeting. The Warren Buckingham Memorial Trophy will be presented to the angler with the Most Outstanding Catch while the Walt Hendee Captain’s Award will be go to the 1st Place Boat captain.
As noted earlier the beautiful Canyon Club Resort Marina in Cape May will host the tournament and also serve as the event’s designated weigh station. Those needing dockage for the event should contact Paul Hoffman at 609-884-0199 to reserve a slip. The tournament gets underway on Thursday, July 25 with a Captain’s Meeting and Cocktail Party from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at the Yacht Club of Stone Harbor located at 9001 Sunset Drive in Stone Harbor. Fishing days are Friday, July 26 and Saturday, July 27. Cocktails, music and dinner will be provided overlooking the infinity edge pool at Canyon Club Resort Marina after each fishing day. The Awards Banquet complete with cocktails, dinner and music is set for Sunday, July 28 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Yacht Club of Stone Harbor.
All boats must sail and return through Cape May Inlet and may not pass the inlet’s sea buoy prior to 4 a.m. on each fishing day. Fishing hours are 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and daily catch reports with released billfish information as well as any tuna or dolphin to be weighed must be at Canyon Club Resort Marina by 9 p.m. on each fishing day. There is no limit to size of tackle, number of lines, teasers or anglers. There is no minimum weight for tuna or dolphin and all billfish including white marlin, blue marlin, sailfish and spearfish will earn 100 points per release. All point ties will be broken on time of catch. The 53rd Annual Marlin Tournament is a billfish release competition with all entrants considered good sportsmen and their fishing (catch) reports will be accepted in the sportsmanlike manner and honor in which the tournament is held.
Whether you’re new to big game tournament fishing or a seasoned veteran, the Yacht Club of
Stone Harbor 53rd Annual Marlin Tournament is a great opportunity to connect with new friends
or renew old ones. With a modest entry fee of $2000 which includes admission to all events for
tournament participants, this family-oriented event is a low-keyed fun tournament you’re sure to
enjoy. Come join us for a few days of friendly fishing competition, camaraderie, hospitality and
fun!
For more information contact Jamie Diller at 609-827-0020 or Aaron Hoffman at 609-412-3778.

 

Seek a $25,000 fluke on Saturday

If you’re a real gambler, the Grandpa Savino  Memorial Tournament is made for you. For a $100 entry, you can try for the largest fluke exceeding 13 pounds in the contest to win $25,000 plus the usual contest payoffs depending on the number of entries — and Calcuttas you enter.  Walter Fisher of the Staten Island Tuna Club has the information. Call him at 917 375-7607 or visit http://www.situnaclub.com.

The Raritan Bay Anglers Club finally got some results from last Saturday’s 29th annual Charity Fluke Tournament up on their Facebook page. The name of the winner was spelled Frank Olma, rather than Olmia as with the photo of his doormat that appeared in the blog. The Monroe Township angler was credited with 12.7 pounds for his doormat that ran away with the contest. He was fishing with Cliff Hanson, who’s been fishing this contest for 20 years. It was caught near the Verrazano Bridge on a combination of a Spro bucktail with Gulp and a killie.

Bill Reilly of Morganville was second at 9.5 pounds, and Manuel Prado of Union took third at 8.25 pounds after having won last year. There was a huge payout of $25,000, almost all of which should have gone to the winner — but he wasn’t in any of the Calcuttas!

A 5-pound fluke will win a fluke rod made by Joey La Monica of Joey’s Custom Rods in the Grandpa Savino contest. If one exactly that size isn’t weighed, the rod goes to the closest.  In the event of a tie, the first weighed wins,

Capt. Ron Santee reported a better start today with his Fishermen from Atlantic Highlands after a very slow Thursday. Shorts were abundant, and some keepers were included up to the 4-pound pool winner.

The Golden Eagle from Belmar reported a decent catch of bonito today along with some blues and ling — all on jigs.

There was a showing of bluefish in Shark River this morning. Though they haven’t been abundant this summer, just about every one caught would be an easy pool winner on the bluefish party boats passing by us as even a 5-pounder would be a large pool winner in the ocean.

Frank Manzi said he had just released a 10-pounder on a popper when I waded out to him, and I hooked one just a bit smaller on a Pili Popper.  Tommy Cox was also into the blues and added the only striper I saw. Joe Blaze was back with his fly rod and released blues of about 4 and 7 pounds. Manzi also recued another horseshoe crab that wouldn’t have survived.

Bob Correll reported the Bay Head surf was surprisingly rough considering the lack of wind in the morning, and nothing was being caught. I saw a cownose ray released by a surfcaster there earlier in the week.

Light winds continue Saturday morning, with 5-10 knot west predicted before increasing to southwest 10-15 in the afternoon. Sunday’s forecast is the same.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Golden Eagle reports another great variety catch

As noted in last night’s blog, party boats have been enjoying super variety chumming not too far offshore, and that continued today according to the Golden Eagle from Belmar report.

They had lots of bonito and chub mackerel along with some blues and Spanish mackerel.  It was all on jigs except for the mackerel, though some Spanish also hit small, shiny lures.

Bob Matthews reports from Fisherman’s Den in Belmar Marina that there are lots of mostly small fluke in the river while boats fishing the ocean are catching more keepers when conditions are good. Jack McLaughlin weighed in a 5 1/4-pounder. Bluefin tuna trolling has held up in the mid-range areas. John Reilly of Hooked Café did a solo trip on his boat and returned with a 70-pounder.

John Andrea ran out of the back of Raritan Bay on the weekend, and then another 63 miles from Sandy Hook to reach the Virginia wreck where bluefins averaging 35 inches were trolled, though chunking at night was unproductive.

Casting in Shark River has been up-and–down this week, though Joe Blaze was very happy to release two school stripers on his fly rod this morning during his first shore attempt there since 2006. He used a Lefty’s Deceiver on an intermediate line.  Vinny D D’Anton caught three small bass, and Tommy Cox also scored –though I only missed two hits on a Tactical Anglers Crossover popper.

Bob Correll reported the Bay Head surf was colder after the south wind, and he only saw one small blue caught after he caught four blues casting metal the previous morning,  including a 3-pounder — and also added a spike weakfish.

The switch to a northeast wind should bring the surf temperature up. It will be just 5-10 knots in the morning before switching to 10-15 with gusts to 20 in the afternoon.

Canyon Runner had great bluefin trips for military

 

The Canyon Runner fleet from Point Pleasant had fast and furious bluefin tuna trolling recently, with the best on free trips for the military and first responders. Those trips were on July 4-5 and 11-12. There were 55 bluefins trolled in half a day, and the 48 Viking hooked 30 in just 2 1/2 hours. Of course, only legal limits of bluefins can be boated.  There were also some unusual catches last week as a 180-pound swordfish hit a Melton Cherry Jet trolled at 4 a.m. — and an 84-inch mako blasted a balao trolled  on a flat line. See photo below. There may be two spots available at $899 during an open trip from Friday to Saturday. Call 732 272-4445.

There’s been a very good run of bonito inshore so far, and they often outnumber the small blues and chub mackerel in party boat chum slicks. Capt. Howard Bogan said that fishing was excellent today on his Jamaica from Brielle as there were often doubleheaders on jigs and teasers. Nickolei Kryenko from Jersey City had a 5-pound bonito for the pool and totaled 17 bonito plus five blues. Manny Molina of Reading, Pa. caught over two dozen bonito and several blues.

84-inch mako on troll

That’s a fluke!

Though I still haven’t been able to find any official results of Saturday’s Raritan Bay Anglers Club Fluke Tournament on their website or facebook, I was able to get a couple of photos and names from Capt. Pete Santero.

Frank Olama ran away with the contest by boating this 12 9/16-pound doormat. Second went to Bill Reilly with a 9 1/2-pounder, and there was an 8 3/4-pounder for third. Ironically, that giant doormat would have just been a “teaser” in the Grandpa Savino Memorial Tournament coning up on Saturday as the $25,000 prize is for the largest fluke over 13 pounds. 12-9 fluke

No doormats in Sandy Hook Bay Anglers Fluke Tournament — but close

The 38th annual Sandy Hook Bay Anglers Club Fluke Tournament continues to follow its two-day format, but even that wasn’t enough to produce a doormat from among the over 100 boats entered. Those entered in Saturday’s Grandpa Savino Memorial Tournament sponsored by the Staten Island Tuna Club will have to do a lot better in order to claim a $25,000 prize for the largest fluke over 13 pounds.  For info call Walter Fisher at 917 375-7607, or visit situnaclub.com.

There was plenty of action during the two beautiful days as more than 60 fluke were weighed in.  Brian Dunn of the Sandy Hook Bay Anglers reports that the $3000 winner was  Ryan Belusko from Coplay, PA   as angler Mike Kalincheck boated a near-doormat of  9.6 pounds that was  28 1/2 inches long. He won clearly over two 8.4-pounders. Wade Piscadlo from Manville won the second place $1,000 with his 27-incher over Tom Licknack of Hightstown who settled for the third place $600 for his 28-incher on a time basis.

Then there was a three-way tie at 6.8 pounds, with the $350 for fourth going to Don Howard of Perth Amboy with a 25 1/4-incher that was the Saturday leader and earned him another $200. Mike Ramirez from Matawan won $250 for fifth with a 26-incher — and fluke pro Vito Manzi from Morganville had an identical fluke for sixth and $125. Finishing up were two 6.4-pounders. Eugene Duffner of Freehold received $100 for his 24 1/4-incher, and James Romano of Port Monmouth had a 23-incher for $75. The ladies prize of a rod and reel was taken by Janet Stone of Succasunna with a 4.2-pound entry.

After trying to get results of Saturday’s Raritan Bay Anglers Club Fluke Tournament since that day, it appears I’ll have it for tomorrow’s blog.

Bob Matthews reports from Fisherman’s Den in Belmar Marina that there are lots of mostly short fluke in Shark River though a 5-pounder was caught over the weekend from one of his rental skiffs.  The party boats are finding more keepers offshore. Triggerfish are in the inlet along with sea robins and stargazers — and kingfish are biting in the surf.

Capt. Chris De Stefano said Frank Criscola’s Crisdel from Brielle Yacht Club caught two swordfish in the 100-pound class and kept one in South Toms. He heard that the mid-range bluefin bite was good, and Phil Fischer confirmed that as he got fillets from a friend who trolled  feathers 20-40 miles offshore without hooking up before switching to sub-surface spoons to keep one out of four tuna.

Great weather continues as the forecast for Tuesday is west winds at 5 knots before going south in the afternoon at 10-15 knots with gusts to 20.

 

 

 

The Jamaica from Brielle reported a good Sunday chumming trip with some limits of small blues on jigs plus bonito (see photo below) —  and chub mackerel on bait. They’re sailing daily for that fishing at 7:30 a.m.

bonito-Jamaica

 

Whale provides more excitement than fluke in Raritan Bay.

Scott Leadbeater did pretty well with fluke yesterday in Raritan Bay, but that was nothing compared to a relatively close call with a whale. In trying to copy his account, I ended up with duplications and boxes. Please scroll down and over any duplications I didn’t get out.

As you know well, there no telling what you might see or find during a fishing trip at sea.  Well I had an amazing moment yesterday.

Now I might expect this somewhere off-shore, or at the Rocks.  But where I was and with the activity around on a Saturday morning, is what was amazing to me.

I was fluke fishing, and actually putting together a decent catch.  Location the Knoll.  Drifting the mussel  beds in roughly 20ft depth.  On the outgoing tide drift I was working my lines, facing to the west as the drift was to the east.  Suddenly I heard what sounded like a high pressure hose let loose behind me.  I turned and there was a whale surfaced and blowing it’s air spout, only 60ft away.  I say 60 ft because my boat is a 20ft cc and I swear it was only 3 boat lengths away !  It was huge !  3 other boats near by suddenly were hollering excitement also.  The whale appeared to be 6-8 ft across at it’s back. I saw maybe 20 ft of it at mid section.  So the thing might have been 50-60ft.  Water rolled off the brown-black whale like it was a submarine. (I used to see subs a lot when fishing at Jax Fla).  It was stunning.  It went under water directly beneath my small boat, I know that because it’s next surface and air blow was maybe 100ft on my port side.  It stayed there for a moment, blowing another time near the same area, and then disappeared.  I had a few words with the other boat closest to me and to the whale.  They were as shocked as I was.

Do you have any idea what kind of whale this might have been ?  And what was so surprising was where this took place and at 9:30 on a Saturday morning with boat traffic and fishing lines all over the area.

Never know what you might find when venturing out on the sea.”

Scott Leadbeater had surprisingly good fluking yesterday. but was more excited about a near-encounter with a whale on his Aquasport from Atlantic Highlands. s detailed below:

 

As you know well, there’s no telling what you might see or find during a fishing trip at sea.  Well I had an amazing moment yesterday.

Now I might expect this somewhere off-shore, or at the Rocks.  But where I was and with the activity around on a Saturday morning, is what was amazing to me.

I was fluke fishing, and actually putting together a decent catch.  Location the Knoll.  Drifting the mussel beds in roughly 20ft depth.  On the outgoing tide drift I was working my lines, facing to the west as the drift was to the east.  Suddenly I heard what sounded like a high pressure hose let loose behind me.  I turned and there was a whale surfaced and blowing its air spout, only 60ft away.  I say 60 ft because my boat is a 20ft cc and I swear it was only 3 boat lengths away !  It was huge !  3 other boats near by suddenly were hollering excitement also.  The whale appeared to be 6-8 ft across at it’s back. I saw maybe 20 ft of it at mid section.  So the thing might have been 50-60ft.  Water rolled off the brown-black whale like it was a submarine. (I used to see subs a lot when fishing at Jax Fla).  It was stunning.  It went under water directly beneath my small boat, I know that because it’s next surface and air blow was maybe 100ft on my port side.  It stayed there for a moment, blowing another time near the same area, and then disappeared.  I had a few words with the other boat closest to me and to the whale.  They were as shocked as I was.

Do you have any idea what kind of whale this might have been ?  And what was so surprising was where this took place and at 9:30 on a Saturday morning with boat traffic and fishing lines all over the area.

Never know what you might find when venturing out on the sea.”

Fin whales have been most common in our area, and it’s surprising that there aren’t many close calls when striper fishermen are drifting in the schools of bunkers they feed on. They used to be unheard of in the bay, but have become fairly common there in the last few years.

 

To avoid any confusion about party boat tuna trips listed yesterday, the Jamaica’s Monday trip is in July 21 at midnight. They did well Saturday with blues and bonito plus a Spanish mackerel — but not as well as the previous day when there some bluefish limits. Kevin Brown of Manahawkin won the pool with a 5-pound blue.
Dan Rothman reported that the bay was a bit rough in a stronger west wind than predicted and he only found some short fluke off Officer’s Row for the kids aboard before heading up to the Navesink where there was a weed problem in a fast current.
I tried all day to get results from yesterday’s Raritan Bay Anglers Club Fluke Tournament , but had no success. Same thing last year. The Sandy Hook Bay Anglers Fluke Tournament wound up at 6, but calls for info haven’t been returned as yet.  Hopefully, I’ll have that info in tomorrow’s blog.
At Belmar, the Golden Eagle only got into only some blues and bonito offshore, possibly because bluefin tuna were in the click. A 70-pounder broke off and 4 or 5 others were spotted. All the action was on jigs.
The Big Mohawk reported fluking was a struggle today after two good days. There were some limits yesterday. They sail at 6 in the morning.
The forecast tomorrow is for north winds at 5-10 knots shifting to southwest in the afternoon.
F

Party boats set bluefin tuna trips

The bluefin tuna bite on the mid-range grounds off New Jersey’s northern Shore has been productive for private and charter boats, but party boats are also getting into the act since NMFS has made it possible for them to keep a few tuna.

The Queen Mary from Point Pleasant had a trip last week during which they were hooking tuna up to 100 pounds on jigs by 8:30 a.m. They boated their limit of two over 47 inches and released four after fights of over 30 minutes. A move to another area with smaller tuna also proved to be productive.   All the action was on jigs. The next trips are coming up on July 23 and 30. Lots of bonito and small blues are being caught on other days.

Queen Mary bluefin

As previously noted, the Jamaica from Brielle has added a tuna trip on Monday — and the Golden Eagle from Belmar has added one on July 30 from midnight to 4 p.m. The cost for the latter is $260 with a limit of 30. Though there wasn’t a report from the Golden Eagle at the time this was written, they had good action yesterday with blues and chub mackerel though not as many bonito as before since the drift was too fast and they had to anchor.

At Atlantic Highlands, Capt. Ron Santee reported a new monthly fluke leader during Friday’s trip of the Fishermen as Bill Venezia boated a 6 11/16-pounder. He also limited and caught about 30 shorts.  A 4-pound sea bass was also boated. The Fishermen is chartered tomorrow.

Capt. Rob Semkewyc of the Sea Hunter saw more quality fluke Friday when his fares also were treated to a whale show.

The Mimi VI from Point Pleasant will be sailing open for $75 at 7 a.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday and July 31. Call 732 370-8019 for reservations.

The Sandy Hook Bay Anglers Club Fluke Tournament winds up its two-day run on Sunday. At this writing I haven’t had any calls from excited anglers in that contest or the one-day Raritan Bay Anglers Fluke Tournament which featured so many Calcuttas that the winner, if all-in, may need a body guard to get home.

The marine forecast for Sunday is for west winds at a mere 5-10 knots.

The Gambler from Point Pleasant had a season-leading fluke last weekend when Curtis Mc Nary boated an 8.14-pounder. However, they had something much more unusual Friday when two small cobia were released. Blog reader Frank Jones sent a shot of his son Kyle, a mate on that boat, with one of them. The minimum size for cobia in N.J. is 40 inches with a limit of one per angler — but only two per boat.

Gambler cobia